I hate the NIL!!

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Spot on in about every way...including pointing out that this is largely a genuine scam...and, definitely with respect to the value that Miller Kopp's endorsement of YMCA of Monroe Co.

Schools, including Indinia, are spinning this for sure...they are not the only ones by any means, and, my guess is that Purdue may try spinning it to some extent as well even (we will see).

I am guessing that the charitable organizations involved are receiving some money behind he scenes as well to be involved, so, while they are part of the scam, they also are getting something out of being a part of it (aside of a Miller Kopp meaningless commercial or endorsement).
This is over and above what the charity’s already get. Would they have gotten the money anyway? No probably not. This is a way to get more.
 

boilerball2021

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Spot on in about every way...including pointing out that this is largely a genuine scam...and, definitely with respect to the value that Miller Kopp's endorsement of YMCA of Monroe Co.

Schools, including Indinia, are spinning this for sure...they are not the only ones by any means, and, my guess is that Purdue may try spinning it to some extent as well even (we will see).

I am guessing that the charitable organizations involved are receiving some money behind he scenes as well to be involved, so, while they are part of the scam, they also are getting something out of being a part of it (aside of a Miller Kopp meaningless commercial or endorsement).
Just for general reference, our Boiler Alliance collective is structured the same way. Our athletes will be payed to show up to charity events.
 

DAG10

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So did UK, Auburn etc do it the right way? The right way is now. Things change. You are seeing people finally getting what’s due. These universities have made major profits off these kids. Why PU didn’t get behind(while getting behind) NIL is the sad part. It’s their fault. Also, while the feds/congress gets involved it will still be up to the states to deal with NIL. Pretty soon schools will be directly involved. Missouri and Tennessee are already ahead of this with their senators on board. It’s a very complicated issue and it’s not going away.
Without a long back-and-forth...

The only thing that changed is that what had been cheating and now allowed is now ok, so, UK, Auburn, etc. that already were doing such things under the table or behind the scenes are now not only able to do it publicly, but, they can do it on a grander scale because there is no regulation any longer.

This whole notion that kids suffered in any way is simply not true...not even remotely true for that matter...as is the idea that they are getting "what's due." The idea behind NIL was that the schools should not be able to profit off of a kid's direct NIL, or, that the kids should be able to do so...no school is profiting by a student-athlete doing a commercial or helping at an event for a charity, but, kids are now getting paid for it.

If kids don't value their full-ride scholarship, let them forfeit it and pay for it with the money that they can make through NIL...as, absent the scholarship (and platform that it provides), their value is, ironically, pretty much nil.

Purdue's issues are largely indeed Purdue-issues, but, just because schools that cheated previously are ahead of the game, or, schools that could not compete because they did not cheat can now buy their way back to competing does not mean that it is right, much less even some sort of "good" thing...it is the reality of the moment for sure, but, it is indeed a scam and a facade.

It is not complicated though as you suggest...not at all for that matter...it is merely a case largely of what had been cheating no longer being such, and, schools (and, apparently even states to your point with respect to Missouri and Tennessee) just figuring out how to exploit that to the greatest degree.
 
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DAG10

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This is over and above what the charity’s already get. Would they have gotten the money anyway? No probably not. This is a way to get more.
But that is THE point...that it really is not...Miller Kopp doing a commercial or showing up at the YMCA for a day is not going to generate $40,000 for the YMCA...they would have been better off with the school making a $40,000 donation...THAT is the point that was/is being made.
 
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But that is THE point...that it really is not...Miller Kopp doing a commercial or showing up at the YMCA for a day is not going to generate $40,000 for the YMCA...they would have been better off with the school making a $40,000 donation...THAT is the point that was/is being made.
Agree Dag!
so what is a reasonable payment for an athlete to show up at a charitable event? Right now it could be anything: 10,000, 300,000, a million. Will the athlete be expected to give a majority of his pay to the charity? After all, is that a point of a charitable event: giving money to a charity. Not making a bunch of money for yourself. Stinks of scam, but, hey, it’s legal.

The NIL craziness is going to get much much worse before anyone steps in to clean it up imo.
 
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boilerball2021

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But that is THE point...that it really is not...Miller Kopp doing a commercial or showing up at the YMCA for a day is not going to generate $40,000 for the YMCA...they would have been better off with the school making a $40,000 donation...THAT is the point that was/is being made.
While I agree that Miller Kopp’s endorsement isn’t worth $40k to the YMCA, it’s definitely worth something. I believe @Victorbmyboy is saying that without NIL or this collective, the YMCA wouldn’t be getting the $40k OR Miller Kopp’s endorsement. There would be no $40k without the collective as that money came from donors who are doing it to funnel money to Kopp, not because they are interested in the charity.

It’s more beneficial to have a charitable aspect to NIL than paying Miller Kopp $40k to sign a single autograph. Something for a charity is better than nothing.
 
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But that is THE point...that it really is not...Miller Kopp doing a commercial or showing up at the YMCA for a day is not going to generate $40,000 for the YMCA...they would have been better off with the school making a $40,000 donation...THAT is the point that was/is being made.
But the school wasn’t going to do that. They weren’t going to generate 40k. That 40k is generated separately. It’s not as cut and dried as you think.
 
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While I agree that Miller Kopp’s endorsement isn’t worth $40k to the YMCA, it’s definitely worth something. I believe @Victorbmyboy is saying that without NIL or this collective, the YMCA wouldn’t be getting the $40k OR Miller Kopp’s endorsement. There would be no $40k without the collective as that money came from donors who are doing it to funnel money to Kopp, not because they are interested in the charity.

It’s more beneficial to have a charitable aspect to NIL than paying Miller Kopp $40k to sign a single autograph. Something for a charity is better than nothing.
Bingo. Thanks for the clarification.
 
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Without a long back-and-forth...

The only thing that changed is that what had been cheating and now allowed is now ok, so, UK, Auburn, etc. that already were doing such things under the table or behind the scenes are now not only able to do it publicly, but, they can do it on a grander scale because there is no regulation any longer.

This whole notion that kids suffered in any way is simply not true...not even remotely true for that matter...as is the idea that they are getting "what's due." The idea behind NIL was that the schools should not be able to profit off of a kid's direct NIL, or, that the kids should be able to do so...no school is profiting by a student-athlete doing a commercial or helping at an event for a charity, but, kids are now getting paid for it.

If kids don't value their full-ride scholarship, let them forfeit it and pay for it with the money that they can make through NIL...as, absent the scholarship (and platform that it provides), their value is, ironically, pretty much nil.

Purdue's issues are largely indeed Purdue-issues, but, just because schools that cheated previously are ahead of the game, or, schools that could not compete because they did not cheat can now buy their way back to competing does not mean that it is right, much less even some sort of "good" thing...it is the reality of the moment for sure, but, it is indeed a scam and a facade.

It is not complicated though as you suggest...not at all for that matter...it is merely a case largely of what had been cheating no longer being such, and, schools (and, apparently even states to your point with respect to Missouri and Tennessee) just figuring out how to exploit that to the greatest degree.
Cheating? Is there proof? I’d say every school has skirted/pushed the rules at times. If you don’t think so you are being obtuse. Just about every shoe company has helped recruit to every school in some way. Of course they help some more than others. This is no longer a “hey those guys are cheating”. Play the game or don’t. I’d say PU will be playing the game.
 

DAG10

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Agree Dag!
so what is a reasonable payment for an athlete to show up at a charitable event? Right now it could be anything: 10,000, 300,000, a million. Will the athlete be expected to give a majority of his pay to the charity? After all, is that a point of a charitable event: giving money to a charity. Not making a bunch of money for yourself. Stinks of scam, but, hey, it’s legal.

The NIL craziness is going to get much much worse before anyone steps in to clean it up imo.
I have no idea, and, more importantly, it does not matter...as, to your point, they can be paid literally anything for it.

To your question as to what is expected...I am confident that very little is expected actually...it is not the charity that is giving them the money obviously, and, it is merely a facade otherwise...the collective paying him is using the idea of his doing work for the charity to justify its payment opposed to any actual requirement of work (aside of having done literally "something").

It is a scam for sure, but, so was paying guys way back for summer jobs...guys getting what was at the time big money to mow a lawn or mop a floor. That ultimately got called out and addressed...this potentially will at some point as well...but, as it is, it is indeed a scam.
 
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DAG10

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Cheating? Is there proof? I’d say every school has skirted/pushed the rules at times. If you don’t think so you are being obtuse. Just about every shoe company has helped recruit to every school in some way. Of course they help some more than others. This is no longer a “hey those guys are cheating”. Play the game or don’t. I’d say PU will be playing the game.
Don't be so sure...Purdue did not "play the game" before, and, it is choosing not play it now, or, at least not play it as others are...and, I doubt that they ever do/will.

Yes, there is proof that TONS of schools cheated...Louisville, Arizona, Auburn, LSU, Kentucky (and MANY others), and, those schools are going to do what they always did, just on a grander scale as I had said now that they are allowed to do so. Those were not cases of skirting/pushing rules...they blatantly cheated...and, now, they are just doing what they did (and more), because, now they can.

If I were obtuse or ignorant of the matter and it was pointed out, I would own up to it, but, in this case...I don't believe it to be true, and, to that point, it is you that may be being obtuse as I am VERY confident that there is not a single guy that any shoe company guided or delivered to Purdue.
 
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boilerball2021

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Don't be so sure...Purdue did not "play the game" before, and, it is choosing not play it now, or, at least not play it as others are...and, I doubt that they ever do/will.

Yes, there is proof that TONS of schools cheated...Louisville, Arizona, Auburn, LSU, Kentucky (and MANY others), and, those schools are going to do what they always did, just on a grander scale as I had said now that they are allowed to do so. Those were not cases of skirting/pushing rules...they blatantly cheated...and, now, they are just doing what they did (and more), because, now they can.

If I were obtuse or ignorant of the matter and it was pointed out, I would own up to it, but, in this case...I don't believe it to be true, and, to that point, it is you that may be being obtuse as I am VERY confident that there is not a single guy that any shoe company guided or delivered to Purdue.
We have to play the game now, and we just took a very big step with the Boiler Alliance collective. Everyone should donate early and often.
 
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Don't be so sure...Purdue did not "play the game" before, and, it is choosing not play it now, or, at least not play it as others are...and, I doubt that they ever do/will.

Yes, there is proof that TONS of schools cheated...Louisville, Arizona, Auburn, LSU, Kentucky (and MANY others), and, those schools are going to do what they always did, just on a grander scale as I had said now that they are allowed to do so. Those were not cases of skirting/pushing rules...they blatantly cheated...and, now, they are just doing what they did (and more), because, now they can.

If I were obtuse or ignorant of the matter and it was pointed out, I would own up to it, but, in this case...I don't believe it to be true, and, to that point, it is you that may be being obtuse as I am VERY confident that there is not a single guy that any shoe company guided or delivered to Purdue.
So no Nike AAU kid went to Purdue? I’m not saying he/she was directly paid. In the past everyone accused AAU of being dirty. It’s all a game. If a kid got a free pizza from an alum every Tuesday is considered cheating. It’s always happened.
 

DAG10

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But the school wasn’t going to do that. They weren’t going to generate 40k. That 40k is generated separately. It’s not as cut and dried as you think.
Agree and should not have said "school" to your point...a donation from the collective or alliance rather than the school.

Nobody is generating anything here...Miller (or whoever) is getting $40k from someone "separate" and it is not because he is bringing value to the YMCA, certainly not $40k worth...likely not even $4k worth...maybe not even $40 worth.

So, Miller (or whoever) getting $40k is genuinely and literally at the expense of the charity getting it despite his/their somehow allegedly doing this for the benefit of the charity...so, it is as cut and dry as I think.
 
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Can't wait for Indinia to STILL suck despite "not getting left behind"...not surprising at all that the only way that Indinia could possibly even find its way back to even remote relevance was by buying their way back...that is the real shame of NIL...that programs that were built the right way and have indeed established themselves get to "fall behind" as you noted to schools like LSU (or, ULS in Rickie Collin's case) and Indinia that buy their way into competing instead.
Sure if that is how you feel. Indiana has always recruited better than Pressure, just had some bad coaches. Indiana is just playing the game as they should. They are a bluebird and national brand, something Purdue isn't. And Purdue for some reason is being incredibly hard headed about it. You can get kids that want to be at Purdue and get their endorsements. Purdue just had to embrace it.
 
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Agree and should not have said "school" to your point...a donation from the collective or alliance rather than the school.

Nobody is generating anything here...Miller (or whoever) is getting $40k from someone "separate" and it is not because he is bringing value to the YMCA, certainly not $40k worth...likely not even $4k worth...maybe not even $40 worth.

So, Miller (or whoever) getting $40k is genuinely and literally at the expense of the charity getting it despite his/their somehow allegedly doing this for the benefit of the charity...so, it is as cut and dry as I think.
Purdue and it’s collective donors/charities will take the position of everyone else moving forward. These arguments are over as they will pay what they can. No more finger pointing. They will get what they get. It’s time for schools and coaches to get on board.
 

DAG10

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So no Nike AAU kid went to Purdue? I’m not saying he/she was directly paid. In the past everyone accused AAU of being dirty. It’s all a game. If a kid got a free pizza from an alum every Tuesday is considered cheating. It’s always happened.
Won't even respond to the notion of getting a free pizza a week constituting cheating as you know very well that THAT is not what we are talking about...then, or especially now.

And, no, there is not a kid that played for a Nike AAU team that went to Purdue BECAUSE he played for a Nike AAU team...I get that the same is not true on your side, but, it is true on the Purdue-side.

In the past, AAU WAS DIRTY...incredibly dirty...it still is in cases.
 
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Is this why we won’t play in the NIL game? It did not go well last time.

 
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Won't even respond to the notion of getting a free pizza a week constituting cheating as you know very well that THAT is not what we are talking about...then, or especially now.

And, no, there is not a kid that played for a Nike AAU team that went to Purdue BECAUSE he played for a Nike AAU team...I get that the same is not true on your side, but, it is true on the Purdue-side.

In the past, AAU WAS DIRTY...incredibly dirty...it still is in cases.
Yes it is. It’s dumb to think how either school wouldn’t jump on the other for doing that and getting caught. AAU is only dirty because some say it is. They are just working under the rules. Romeo Langford dad for instance played the game and all of a sudden it was dirty. Well it’s not. Believe me ethics isn’t considered cheating but it sure gets called out.
 
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Is this why we won’t play in the NIL game? It did not go well last time.

Yep..PU never cheated or was unethical. Cheating/stretching rules has always happened and will continue. Just get better at it.
 
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Yes it is. It’s dumb to think how either school wouldn’t jump on the other for doing that and getting caught. AAU is only dirty because some say it is. They are just working under the rules. Romeo Langford dad for instance played the game and all of a sudden it was dirty. Well it’s not. Believe me ethics isn’t considered cheating but it sure gets called out.
Remember when Hanner and Peter got v suspended because their handler was considered a booster for buying some bumper stickers before they were born?
 
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Statey

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$425,000 for 11 players. Averages about $40,000 a piece, for this one deal. Add that on top of free college tuition and a stipend for room and board. Not to bad especially since some of these guys won't even be in the rotation.


I was really confused by how this works, so here is another article.


I think the thing that bothers me as much as anything is the idea that schools are trying to position this as a way for students to give back and be part of the community How much value does an endorsement of a guy like Miller Kopp bring to the YMCA of Monroe County? I'll answer my own question. None. I'm sure the YMCA would be better served getting a $40,000 direct donation of cash from the alumni or have Miller Kopp actually work at the Y running youth programs. There are a lot of good people doing a lot of good work for organizations like the ones mentioned above for nothing in return. That's giving back.

In some way it makes me feel less positive about the charitable organizations involved because in my view it makes them look like they are in on the scam and I wouldn't give a dime to the lot of them.
I'm not 100% sure I understand all the NIL charitable collective stuff, but I think it's designed in a way (compliant with IRS rules, surprisingly to this accountant) that allows donors to give money to charities and charities dole it out to student athletes for "services rendered", whatever all that might entail. So it doesn't feel like there is scam for the charity to be in on, unless you're saying that the fans or corporations donating to this are the ones being scammed. Which I don't think is the case, as they are gladly giving away money for the stated objective of providing some form of compensation to the athletes.

If there is a scam here, the "scammee" is the IRS. They have basically blessed this pass-through of funds to private individuals, which should be governed by some fair market value standards. To what degree they're determined appropriateness of the amounts is beyond me, but that would seem to be a really big deal since the money is flowing through the hands of a 501(c)(3) and donors are entitled to a tax deduction from it.
 
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FirstDownB

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it's an accurate one from a knowledgeable coach at a rival D1 school who knows a lot more about NIL and its NCAA rules than the vast majority of posters here. . it's not the job of the school to find NIL money for athletes. Athletes can go anywhere they want to get NIL money. Obviously, if you sell yourself to some BIG NIL benefactor, he basically owns you, and will probably dictate what you can and cannot do, and where he wants you to play. That QB that went to OSU and then transferred to Texas, received a NIL over $1 million. However, it had factors in order to receive all of it, one of those factors was starting. and that wasn't going to happen at OSU. just because he changed schools doesn't mean his NIL went away. In his case, his owner/bnefactor wasn't that concerned where he plays. However, some NIL benefactors do.

NIL is not supposed to be used for recruiting purposes. although if you believe the internet, that's what appears to be happening. I believe you may see the NCAA take action against schools that use NIL as a recruiting tool.

I can't believe adidas, Nike and Converse can't use NIL as a way of paying their athletes.

and all these collectives are not the school. the big money you see being tossed around on NIL comes from individuals, not collectives. Purdue's collective is a drop in the bucket to what some indivduals give out. and if you read about Purdue's alumni response on other sites, You'll find the majority of Purdue alumni are NOT interested in donating to the JPC, the collective or the NIL !


and as I said before, NIL money is not free money. Those people will want and demand something in return for their generosity. People don't give away money without expecting something in return. the vast majority of NIL money comes with a contract. it will be interesting to see how many atletes take the money but don't fulfill their contracts. or flunk out of school
I am curious how honest you would expect a coach to be with you about such a sensitive topic with a ton of gray area to navigate. Of course these NIL deals are not executed BY the schools but with full knowledge of people associated with the athletic programs. And the deals absolutely have strings attached to them. John Ruiz isn't just a fan of Nijel Pack. He's a fan of him wearing a Hurricane uniform. Obviously nobody is going to come out and say it is a recruiting tool because an admission of wrongdoing is basically the only thing that would get somebody in trouble with gray area as far and wide as the eye can see.
 
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Remember when Hanner and Peter got v suspended because their handler was considered a booster for buying some bumper stickers before they were born?
Yes and IU got lambasted for it. There was a whole SI article on it. Scott Drew was involved too. That’s why he will never be a head coach candidate in Indiana. He also isn’t liked by the high school coaches here. I think it was like 40 bucks worth.🤦🏻
 
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I'm not 100% sure I understand all the NIL charitable collective stuff, but I think it's designed in a way (compliant with IRS rules, surprisingly to this accountant) that allows donors to give money to charities and charities dole it out to student athletes for "services rendered", whatever all that might entail. So it doesn't feel like there is scam for the charity to be in on, unless you're saying that the fans or corporations donating to this are the ones being scammed. Which I don't think is the case, as they are gladly giving away money for the stated objective of providing some form of compensation to the athletes.

If there is a scam here, the "scammee" is the IRS. They have basically blessed this pass-through of funds to private individuals, which should be governed by some fair market value standards. To what degree they're determined appropriateness of the amounts is beyond me, but that would seem to be a really big deal since the money is flowing through the hands of a 501(c)(3) and donors are entitled to a tax deduction from it.
It’s just an easier way to get what everyone wants. The ymca gets a donation as well as the person representing them. Everyone gets something. It’s also easier for a regular guy just to write a check without the hassle of sponsoring a player. Win/win.
 
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Every school cheats a little. I just want to win. It’s fair game now with NIL. Get with the times or get left behind. It’s been 40 years and I’m sick of the excuses, when the NCAA has made it a level playing field now if you want to pay players.
 

Statey

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I am curious how honest you would expect a coach to be with you about such a sensitive topic with a ton of gray area to navigate. Of course these NIL deals are not executed BY the schools but with full knowledge of people associated with the athletic programs. And the deals absolutely have strings attached to them. John Ruiz isn't just a fan of Nijel Pack. He's a fan of him wearing a Hurricane uniform. Obviously nobody is going to come out and say it is a recruiting tool because an admission of wrongdoing is basically the only thing that would get somebody in trouble with gray area as far and wide as the eye can see.
It seems like the best one could hope for is that coaching staffs aren't trying to broker deals themselves or trying to help a kid get specific terms in advance like the $400k/yr Pack situation. Yes, we have NIL. Yes, we can share with you some particulars of what past players received. Yes, we have a staffer whose entire job it is to help connect interested parties. That kind of stuff. Doubtful that occurs in practice though unless something happens with the Miami/Ruiz situation that ultimately impacts the school or a player's eligibility. Short of a penalty that the coach has to endure, there is literally no incentive for self-regulation.
 

Statey

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So, Miller (or whoever) getting $40k is genuinely and literally at the expense of the charity getting it despite his/their somehow allegedly doing this for the benefit of the charity...so, it is as cut and dry as I think.
That's the thing though, it's not at the expense of the charity. In your example, the YMCA didn't have to pay anything to get him to be their spokesman, do a commercial with him, or whatever. The money is coming from members of the community. Certainly the YMCA would rather have cold hard cash for their mission than a free-of-charge spokesman, but those are not the choices being presented. Their choices are a) nothing, or b) a no-cost endorsement by Miller Kopp and he comes talk to some kids one day about the importance of team sports and getting good grades. The only true "expense" to the YMCA is any costs they incur unique to this arrangement that they wouldn't have otherwise occurred, and that they weren't able to offset via additional fundraising or proceeds received related to said arrangement.
 
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Every school cheats a little. I just want to win. It’s fair game now with NIL. Get with the times or get left behind. It’s been 40 years and I’m sick of the excuses, when the NCAA has made it a level playing field now if you want to pay players.
I’m hoping PU gets with it. I hope it helps IU. I want this rivalry back to elite status. I think most are ready.
 
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It seems like the best one could hope for is that coaching staffs aren't trying to broker deals themselves or trying to help a kid get specific terms in advance like the $400k/yr Pack situation. Yes, we have NIL. Yes, we can share with you some particulars of what past players received. Yes, we have a staffer whose entire job it is to help connect interested parties. That kind of stuff. Doubtful that occurs in practice though unless something happens with the Miami/Ruiz situation that ultimately impacts the school or a player's eligibility. Short of a penalty that the coach has to endure, there is literally no incentive for self-regulation.
Already being addressed. Senators in various states are trying to write NIL laws that allow coaches and schools to help broker and/or guide students to deals. Shoe companies for the school will be allowed at some point to pay also. If anyone thinks the NCAA has any power hasn’t been following. The courts gave most of the rights to NIL laws and rules to states.
 

FirstDownB

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It seems like the best one could hope for is that coaching staffs aren't trying to broker deals themselves or trying to help a kid get specific terms in advance like the $400k/yr Pack situation. Yes, we have NIL. Yes, we can share with you some particulars of what past players received. Yes, we have a staffer whose entire job it is to help connect interested parties. That kind of stuff. Doubtful that occurs in practice though unless something happens with the Miami/Ruiz situation that ultimately impacts the school or a player's eligibility. Short of a penalty that the coach has to endure, there is literally no incentive for self-regulation.
"Hi, Coach Larranaga. This is John Ruiz"
"Hello Mr. Ruiz"
"Coach, I just want to let you know that I am a big supporter of yours and your program. The Miami Hurricanes are a tremendous source of pride for me and my family."
"Glad to hear it. Thanks for your support and generosity."
"Absolutely. Any time."
"Was there anything else?"
"Well, since we are talking, I was curious who your favorite player is in the portal."
"We have been pursuing this kid from K-State pretty hard."
"Interesting. And he hasn't committed anywhere yet?"
"No, he is still weighing his options. He seems to be leaning toward Purdue."
"Purdue. What are they offering?"
"A scholarship and playing time, to the best of my knowledge."
"That's it?"
"As far as I know."
"And how much value would a player like that add to your roster this year?"
"Well, that's hard to quantify, but we are in need of another talented guard. With that filled I'd say we could give Duke and Carolina a run for their money."
"Hey, that sounds great, Coach. Best of luck this upcoming season."
"Thank you Mr. Ruiz"

Somebody convince me:
(1) Conversations like this aren't taking place all over the country between coach and booster
(2) This is not a recruiting tool
(3) Anything from the conversation will stick in court or NCAA
 

PUQBMan.

True Freshman
Mar 5, 2015
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I'm going to disagree. a lot of posters here are saying the schools are finding these NIL deals for their athletes. I'm not so sure that's true. Has any school come forward and said we set up these NIl deals? In reference to Pack, the school said nothing. We found out about it because the benefactor made it public.

this brings up the question, did the school find a NIL benefactor for PACK ? or did that NIL benefactor find PACK and brought him to the school?

This is speculation on my part. I don't have facts yet to back up my theory. But I'm putting this out there as food for thought.

it's a given especially for basketball athletes, that they have handlers. Look at all the NCAA cases. they all point to somebody acting as ana agent or midleman getting the athlete his money under the table. This practice has gone on for decades. there are people who get in touch with players, get them money and then tell the player what university or place to go.

so what if ..................................

instead of Universities finding NIL donors, the real story is these old slime ball handlers are the ones finding this NIL money and then telling the player he needs to go to a certain school to get it? and for getting the player this great NIL deal, this slimeball handler takes 10% of the deal.

we all know the background of Swanigan coming to purdue. basically, he had an advisor/handler. All of the tp players have advisors/handlers. You can call them advisors, or agents or lawyers or representatives. it's your choice. but we all know they exists.

it's my contention and speculation that these advisors are the ones finding the big NIL deals and then informing the schools, that their "client" (player) is willing to play for that school.


and these collectives are nothing more than agencies of agents. they may be called a different name. But it's rather obvious what they really are. When a player signs a NIl deal, he's basically signing with an agent. and it's basically his handler that found the NIL deal for him, not the school.


just some food for thought/discussion.
Everything you just said contradicts your original point. So you agree that the players are not the ones seeking out these deals, but instead someone else (whether it’s the school itself or handlers) are finding these deals for them. That is my point. The responsibility is not on the players to find these deal, especially at the schools that are leading the pack (pun intended) with NIL.
To your other point, the schools are quiet about these things, at least publicly, because there’s no need to be announcing these things. They discuss these things behind closed doors with recruits and their families. Jumbo Fisher has claimed multiple times publicly that Texas A&M is not paying for recruits, yet there is video of an assistant coach outright telling recruits on a visit that they will make tons of money by going there. Nowadays it’s just as important to recruits to meet with the school’s NIL coordinator as it is to meet with their academic advisor.